Lenexa police use new technology to send texts after calling 911

TECHNOLOGY
featured image

The Lenexa Police Department uses new technology to keep people safe. It’s called SPIDR Tech, and Lenexa was one of the first departments in the country to use it. This technology texts some caller his message after speaking to his 911 dispatcher. The message can include the status of the officer en route to the call, how to prepare the arriving officer, and the case number of the report. Lenexa Police spokesman Danny Chavez said he hopes this will improve the customer service experience when calling. “We think this is also a positive thing in terms of police communication with individuals and that it improves the customer service experience,” Chavez said. , we know it’s probably already been a bad day. “I don’t want to send them a message when they might be trying to make a call,” Chavez said. You may be in a situation.” The cost of this program is $17,000 per year. Funding for the program comes from the police budget. All messages are automated, but you can unsubscribe. “Our dispatchers and representatives don’t have to take extra steps to send this message,” he says. “No extra steps needed.”

The Lenexa Police Department uses new technology to keep people safe.

It’s called SPIDR Tech, and Lenexa was one of the first departments in the country to use it.

This technology sends text messages to some callers after speaking to a 911 dispatcher. The message can include the status of the officer en route to the call, how to prepare the arriving officer, and the case number of the report.

Lenexa Police spokesman Danny Chavez said he hopes this will improve the customer service experience when calling.

“We think this is also a positive thing in terms of police communication with individuals and that it improves the customer service experience,” Chavez said. , we know it’s probably already a bad day.”

He said it would reduce the burden on individuals contacting departments by text message as resources would be sent to their mobile phones.

Messages are not sent in all cases in case the phone falls into the wrong hands.

“I don’t want to send them a message when they might be discreetly trying to call,” Chavez said. You may be in a situation where you need to focus on escaping.”

The program costs $17,000 annually. Funding for the program comes from the police budget.

All messages are automated, but you can unsubscribe.

“Our dispatchers and representatives don’t have to take extra steps to send this message,” says Chavez. “No extra steps needed.”

Tags